Although Windows 10 has been available for nearly three years, many large organizations still run Windows 7 or 8. But with the end of extended support for Windows 7 less than two years away, many IT departments are only now getting their arms around what will be a necessary upgrade.

Although major upgrades and deployments can be stressful – both for IT decision-makers as well as end users – they also offer strategic opportunities to review the software and services needed to keep your company running smoothly. That makes this an ideal time to dig deep and look at what is working well in your corporate environment, what’s only sort of working – i.e. things work, but users typically have to make an effort and/or turn to kludgey workarounds to get their jobs done – and what isn’t working at all, for either users or IT.

[ Further reading: How to handle Windows 10 updates ]

The time and energy put into these efforts can pay long-term dividends by forcing IT managers to re-think how a company operates, what services will be needed down the road and whether the status quo is worth keeping. Since there’s likely to be disruption whether you stick with the tried-and-true (in most cases, a Windows environment) or jump to an alternative like macOS, IT leaders can take advantage of that to talk to users, ask them what works most efficiently for them, and then re-envision success.

Because of the way Apple has positioned its desktop OS – the latest version is macOS High Sierra – as well as iOS for mobile devices, the prospect of transitioning some (or perhaps all) PC users to macOS is a viable one. This allows companies to take advantage of macOS and its security/management capabilities while also giving users computers like the ones they may already use at home.

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